Educating Special Education Students Who Have Only Attended Private Schools: After Tom F., Who Is Left With The Bill?

  • Alexia M. Baiman

Abstract

Until 1975, American public schools educated one out of every five children with disabilities between the ages of three and twenty-one. That means that, during this period, public school districts around the nation turned away two million disabled students from their classrooms. Of those lucky handicapped students who were admitted, it is estimated that 2.5 million received ineffective education. Prompted by these findings and in response to two highly publicized federal judicial opinions, Congress statutorily decreed the right of disabled children to receive a free appropriate public education. The 1975 Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EHA) funded state education programs that adhered to this new right and opened their school doors to handicapped children. In 1990, the Act morphed into the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), recognizing more types of disabilities as “handicaps” and strengthening the protections for the discriminated group.
Published
2009-04-26
How to Cite
Baiman, Alexia M. 2009. “Educating Special Education Students Who Have Only Attended Private Schools: After Tom F., Who Is Left With The Bill?”. University of Pittsburgh Law Review 71 (1). https://doi.org/10.5195/lawreview.2009.132.
Section
Notes